Parenting Our Children

A group of kids readies to get back to the outside world.

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Setting aside the device and planning in-real-life playdates. Transitioning from drive-by birthdays to bona fide cake-n-jump house celebrations. Leaving the comfort cocoon of living room home school for a return to the classroom.

An African American family takes a summer bike ride.

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The Center for Disease Control and Prevention continues to advise against travel until individuals are fully vaccinated, meaning any summer travel plans should be put on hold for parents who have not received vaccines or any young children as they are still months away from getting CDC approval f

An African American mother meditates with her two young children.

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Your child has likely asked, “Why is it important to share, be good, or kind.” For parents who are religious, the answer might be easy: that is how their religion or how God tells them to behave. But for those who are not religious, the answer might be less obvious.

A young Hispanic girl stares at her phone while in bed.

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With schooling, gaming and social interactions largely depending on the digital world during the pandemic, it’s easy for children and parents to overdo it. But how much is too much?

March is Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month.

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Some children learn to crawl and even walk when they are barely six months old, while others don’t until they are 18 months or older. Toddlers can begin saying words well before their first birthdays, but others won’t utter a word until after they are 2. While babies develop at different rates, s

An African American family enjoys time at the beach.

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Spot exotic birds and animals along the Anhinga Trail in the Everglades. Discover Vizcaya Museum and Gardens’ critters and plants at the majestic Coconut Grove estate.

A young girl enjoys online learning from home.

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Parents may be the primary educators of their children but in these eternal winter days of remote education, many feel increased weight to that 24/7 mandate. They must ensure their children actually log on daily and fully engage in online classes - resisting endless distractions like Roblox.

An African American father speaks with his son on a bench.

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Watching symbols of racism waved inside the Capitol building along with hate-filled banners, t-shirts and propaganda displayed during the riotous events of January are a stark reminder that this country still has a way to go with regard to its race relations.